Year 2 are visiting the Manchester Jewish Museum today. They began with learning all about the Sabbath service.… https://t.co/XlzIkToxIp

Congratulations to the U11 team for winning 10-0 in the first round of the ISA Knockout Cup #tryingourbest

Year 3 are having a great time Tatton Park today learning all about the Stone Age and Iron Age #welovelearning https://t.co/C9R55xQ1aJ


☰ Growth Mindset Day

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Growth Mindset Day

Posted on November 27 2017

Growth Mindset Day

Professor Carol Dweck, the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, coined the terms ‘fixed mindset’ and ‘growth mindset’ to describe the underlying beliefs people have about learning and intelligence.  

Neuroscientists have proved there is a link between mindsets and achievement. The results show, if you believe your brain can grow, you behave differently. When students believe they can get smarter, they understand that effort makes them stronger. Therefore, they put in extra time and effort, and that leads to higher attainment.

Mindsets can transform from fixed to growth, and when they do, it leads to increased motivation and achievement. Your view of yourself can determine everything. If you believe that your qualities are unchangeable, the fixed mindset, you will want to prove yourself correct repeatedly rather than learning from your errors. Changing our beliefs can have an influential impact. The growth mindset creates a powerful passion for learning.

At Forest Park we believe in our school motto ‘I can and I will’ and for our Growth Mindset Enrichment Day we dedicated the time to teaching the children about malleable intelligence (neuroplasticity). That they should acknowledge and embrace imperfections, value the process over the end result, take ownership over their attitude and replace the word ‘failing’ for ‘learning’. As Thomas Edison famously said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”  The teachers also got involved and took on some of their own challenges to learn a new skill!

However, this cannot be an isolated experience to be effective. We understand that teacher practice has a big impact on student mindset and this ideology should be embedded in everyday practice. The feedback that teachers give their students can either encourage a child to choose a challenge and increase achievement or look for an easy way out. To encourage a child to have a growth mindset you should praise the process that the children engage in: their effort, their strategies, their motivation, their perseverance and their improvement.

Take a look at some photographs from our Growth Mindset Enrichment Day here.

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